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of an economy that has been stagnant for about four years. in the meantime the federal government keeps plunging into debt. so if someone brings forward an alternative to at least give us the opportunity to provide effective oversight and to make sure that this money does go to emergency needs and doesn't just fulfill a wish list for what some cities would like to do in the future to prevent against future storms -- not that we shouldn't be debating that, but that doesn't qualify as an emergency need getting money to the people that need it now. these are future decisions. we haven't had time to assess those. we haven't had time to examine those in detail. we haven't used the process that is in place here in the united states senate to go through committees and let the committees work through, is this essential to meeting the emergency needs? or can we set this aside and spend a little more time examining it, looking at it to make sure that this is how we want to go forward? we have a habit here of throwing money at things under an emergency category and then later finding out that, one, it wasn
and the germans do it, they do it right. and weak economies, heavily dependent on exports, heavily dependent on the car industry and that could go up and down. two things. i don't think they have the political will to engage outside the borders and i don't think they have the financial resources to do as much as we thought they should do and even some of their policy people think they should do relative to their national security, strength, military strength. is always not in a condition to do that and a heavy reliance on u.s. presence as that diminishes, some tough decisions to make as other nations. >> good morning. barbara matthews, international regulatory analytics. i have a question about the 20% written large. you have described what sounds like what you consider to be an inevitable retrenchment if not potential return to some isolation in the united states weather for political reasons or budgetary constraint purposes. that is a different position than the guarantor of security and liberty globally. europe may not have the financial resources to pick up the baton. can you describe wh
are not done. [applause] a new world economy is emerging from the depths of this recession, and while its contours and relationships are not fully understood to us, we do know two things. first, with our uniquely powerful fusion of values and talents, washington state has the potential to lead the next wave of world-changing innovations. second, the world will not wait for us. we face fierce and immediate global competition for the jobs of tomorrow. leading this next wave of growth is our opportunity, not our entitlement. we must move, swiftly and boldly, to put this recession behind us, and bring forward a unique economic strategy that brings the best of washington state to the world. as franklin delano roosevelt said, never before have we had so little time in which to do so much. today, i'd like to share my vision of our path ahead. i know that to achieve thi vision, we've all got to work together. democrat and republican, house and senate, east and west, to answer the challenges of our age. i have represented both sides of our state, first as a state representative from yakima valley,
21 allows to continue to improve the way we make, the way we move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs. map 21 helps short project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion, and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 are based on an innovate shun initiative known as every day counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with everyday counts. let's hear it for victor menendez what he has done and his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's trb conference. better, faster, and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, beg thanks goes to peter rogoff of a the train crash here in washington, peter and i sided we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportation into the transit safety bu
class voters, at a time when the economy is going through a very complicated, difficult moment when it's not clear how to get back to growth, he's thinking creatively about how to use the strength of his state to build on its weaknesseses. and i think at the national level that's what conservatives have to do. to some extempt, it's being done. i would say the policy agenda that has to come at the end of that conversation is not fully worked out by any means, but the questions are being asked. i think the direction of thinking has been helpful even in the wake of the election. if you listen to what people like marco rubio or paul ryan have been saying, it's different from what they themselves were saying six months ago, a year ago. i think the focus is turning to the right place. that doesn't mean that he'll persuade the public, but it certainly helps to ask the right question if you're looking for the right answer. >> where joe, i want to bring up something that my friend john podhoretz mentioned, and i say that carefully because reihan salam, my name has up been butchered by others, s
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
economies in the east and the south. now, of course, a growing world economy benefits us all, but we should be in no doubt that a new global race of nations is underway today. a race for the wealth and for the jobs of the future. the map of global influence is changing before our eyes. and these changes are already being felt by the entrepreneur in the netherlands, the worker in germany, the family in britain. so i want to speak to you today with urgency and frankness about the european union and how it does change, both to deliver prosperity and to retain the support of its peoples. but first, i want to set out the spirit in which i approach these issues. i know that the united kingdom is sometimes seen as an argumentative and rather strong-minded member of the family of european nations. and it is true that our geography has shaped our psychology. we have the character of an island nation. we are independent, forthright, passionate in defense of our sovereignty. we can no more change this british sensibility than we can train the english channel. and because of this sensibility, we come t
increase and protected our economy from the fiscal cliff. two-thirds of those votes came from democrats. if the speaker had enforced the hastert rule, we would be over the fiscal cliff today. what happened on sandy? after nearly three months of stalling, while my state, while the presiding officer's state of connecticut, while the states of new york, new jersey and other states struck by sandy were waiting urgently for the relief that we got to the coast within 11 days. they stalled and they stalled because they could not get a majority of the republican caucus to support federal relief for our hurricane-ravaged states. under the hastert rule, they couldn't get that bill to the floor. so speaker boehner once again decided to forego the hastert rule. that's how they got the sandy emergency aid bill passed. look again at the votes. republican "yes" votes for the disaster bill: 49. republican "no" votes for that bill: 179. that bill was dead on arrival under the hastert rule. the republican caucus couldn't support it, wouldn't support it, and we would be without any help now if they follow
tax cuts that would've tripled our -- crippled our economy. would also called on washington not to lose sight of what remains our top priority, job growth. we called for smarter, locally targeted investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both part
budget government at a time that the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world, that we face a more global market and any time in our history. so not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders, in my trips to crisis areas, war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i have been reminded of the importance of the work that our state department does to protect and advance america's interest and to the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world and particularly i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor i pledged to work very closely with this committee, mr. chairman, and mr. ranking member, not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively, nor will our country give what it needs to out of these initiatives without your involvement and your ideas going forward. so thank you, mr. chairman, and members of the committee. anoth
, creating a vibrant economy and restoring fundamental human rights for the libyan people. and he was as enthusiastic as they were about the prospects. there's no question that he will be missed by all who knew him and who worked with them. one of the things that really troubles me, madam secretary, is the hoops that we on this committee have had to jump through to get to the facts surrounding the deaths of these public servants at the state department has laid him delayed coming forth with information. and when this committee was finally presented with relevant data, it amounted oftentimes what would be called a document dump. hundreds of pages of paper in why disarray, in no particular order, either in terms of relevance or in chronology. often in duplicate but in different binders, making it very difficult to locate documents that were of any help. our public servants in libya were murdered on september 11. it's now january 23, more than four months later. it's unacceptable that the state department has made it so difficult for congress to exercise its oversight responsibility.
and they cannot escape. this is devastating for our students and a drag on our overall economy. there was an article a few months ago in "the new york times." it talked about a grandmother who was having her social security check garnished because she had signed on as a co-signer of her granddaughter's student loan. they were going after grandma's social security check. that's how serious this can be. a large coalition of student educational civil rights and consumer organizations support this bill. i hope we can move forward with legislation this year. it's time to restore fairness to our bankruptcy code when it comes to student debt. let me be clear. when used appropriately, student loans are valuable and important. i wouldn't be standing here today if i hadn't borrowed money from the federal government to go to college and law school. i never could have afforded it otherwise. it was called the national defense education act. if i told you the numbers that i borrowed, you will realize how old i am. at the time it was scary to have that much debt come fresh out of law school.
for a sustainable fiscal path toward to my growing economy pump -- policies that will promote job creation and growth. those of the things we're anxious to work on. we have heard very little of. >> on election night the president spoken said, well, we want our children to grow up in a world where they're not burdened by debt. in december the president said spending is in the problem. incredible, incredible deficit reduction plan in the united states to be downgraded. the greatest threat to our national security was our debt. so democrats in the senate are now going to have to make a choice. today agree with the president that spending is not a problem or do they agree with their constituents at home who are focused on the fact that they are burdening our children and grandchildren with a mountain of debt of varying -- burying them under that mountain of debt. it's a step back from wyoming where people continue to beat very concerned and anxious about the debt and realizing, not for them, but for their kids and grandkids to the chance for freedom and opportunity has listened as the debt con
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14